Two inter-connected circles. On the left, a solid green circle represents the “functional” aspects of a product or service. On the right, a larger blurred blue circle represents the more abstract and emotional aspects of “belief” in a product or service. The two circles blend in the middle with a connecting black line.
Two inter-connected circles. On the left, a solid green circle represents the “functional” aspects of a product or service. On the right, a larger blurred blue circle represents the more abstract and emotional aspects of “belief” in a product or service. The two circles blend in the middle with a connecting black line.
Finding the balance of function and belief. The rational with the emotional. The tangible and the intangible.

It’s never been easier to launch a new product. According to Harvard Business School, annually more than 30,000 new consumer products are launched.

But with this fast-track to launch comes a hard truth: of the 30,000 new consumer products launched, 95% fail.

The competition for customer attention has never been greater.

The market is flooded — all with “the next big thing” — ready to grab at your attention.

The effect is a sea of product and business mediocrity.

What’s led to this state of the market? And what can you do to avoid “industry norming” and stand out?

It’s a confusing market for today’s consumers.


How we launched a global brand (in six months) and the things we learned along the way

A style board, showcasing core assets of the new visual identity

As Idean grew from 170 to 750+ people in the space of a year, evolving the story of our brand became crucial to scaling successfully.

Living by example


How Design and Brand teams can play better together to create more meaningful experiences.

In a world of fast-moving, user centred product design sprints, the value of brand can easily be overlooked.

A recent project highlighted this increasingly common problem.

As we finished the fifth sprint of six, a question arose. “When will Brand see this?”

A good question. One that had actually been discussed at length at the beginning. One that, it was decided, could be addressed at a later date in favour of moving quickly. One that came back to bite.

In this example, we were working on designing an experience for a digital product to bring people and knowledge closer together…


Learnings for building positive interactions with your client and design team.

It’s why you’re here. The specialist. The professional. The much needed fresh perspective. The creative energy your client needs to overcome the challenge that lays before them. After all, they aren’t designers, trained in colour theory with an in-depth understanding of user personas and the Bauhaus movement. But they are professionals in their own right and they have a view to share.

It can be easy for people to get lost in the soft, squishy world of the designer when colour palettes, fonts and visual treatments are being discussed…

Steve Whapshott

Creative Director / Designing products with purpose and brands with bold futures @IdeanUK

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store